Greenaway Girls Collection: Molly’s Empire Waist Dress with Pierrette Collar

The empire waist bodice for Molly’s dress was made from the fitted bodice. The neckline and side darts of the basic pattern were transferred to under the bust. The remaining portion of the fitted bodice was taped to a 1/2 A-Line skirt made from the basic skirt draft. A series of muslin toiles were made and adjusted until the lower skirt portion had a smooth fit without the need for darts below the bust.

The sleeves appear to be bell shaped but are just long kimono sleeves attached to front and back bodice. Extra width was added at the outer edges of the sleeve seams. A small vertical tuck runs along the back sleeve so that the fullness was better controlled.

The lower portion of the dress is underlined with tulle to help hold the shape of the A-line skirt much better.

The lace trim for the sleeve was hand stitched to the inside of the sleeve hem. Special application for the Pierrette Collar was developed and will be detailed in the next post.

The ribbon used under the bust is 1/4″ grosgrain ribbon folded in half so that the finished width is 1/8″ It was applied to the dress after sewing bodice and skirt seam. Fell Stitches were used to sew ribbon to dress.

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Accessories for Kaitlynn’s Empire Waist Dress

I wasn’t sure what kind of jewelry would work well with Kaitlynn’s demure empire waist dress. At first I thought a simple crystal drop earring would look very sweet. But given that she has such a large amount of curls I wanted to do something that would balance out the slender effect the empire silhouette creates.

I stopped sketching and doodling and just began to look through all my beads and findings. I very much love the current trend in bold earring designs, especially chandelier earrings and long dangling earrings full of Swarovski crystals.

I decided to go free form and strung some tiny glass beads onto a length of wire. Then I twisted them into a semi-circular shape. The wire at each end of the semi-circle was then cut and twisted together using a needle nose plier. I left one end slightly longer so I could create a loop to go into the eye pin. When I placed these finished earrings into the earholes I thought it worked. The earrings did not get lost in Kaitlynn’s hairstyle and they managed to add some interest by drawing the eye horizontally before going vertically along the lines of the dress.

I highly recommend taking an amount of “play time” out when an accessory or finishing touch cannot be consciously decided once the dolly outfit is completed.

Greenaway Girls Collection: Kaitlynn’s Empire Waist Dress

Kaitlynn’s empire waist dress was inspired by the illustrations of Kate Greenaway as well as 1960s Mod London fashions. Two rows of lace were hand-stitched together to create the collar of the dress.

The neckline was first finished by using bias cut tulle strips around the round neckline. This provided a clean finish to the neckline.

The lace was then steam pressed and shaped by hand into a circle. Lastly it was placed around the finished neckline and stitched into place.The dress has close fitting kimono sleeves. Then, another strip of lace was sewn to the inside of the neckline.

The entire dress was made from a fitted bodice with kimono sleeves joined to a fitted skirt. The lower portion was developed by easing in the remaining dart ease to the bodice.

To give the cotton fabric some extra body to hold the shape of the empire waist I underlined the entire dress in lightweight nylon tulle.

The pocketbook was hand beaded and then sewn together.

1:6 Scale Fashion Doll Lingerie

The bandeax and bikini panty shapes were drawn over the basic slopers and tested on scraps of cotton tulle. Adjustments had to be made to bring the fit closer to the doll’s body and allow for the stretch factor. This was a trial and error process.

The basic patterns for Kaitlynn’s bandeaux bra and bikini panties were made from 1:6 scale fitted bodice and shorts slopers. The stocking pattern was made by tracing the outline of the doll’s leg and foot when the leg and foot were placed sideways on a piece of white paper.

The elbow length glove pattern was created by placing the full length of the doll’s arm and hand against a piece of white paper and tracing around it. The hand for the glove is shaped like a mitten. Care has to be taken to leave enough space between thumb and the rest of the fingers.

To give the bandeaux and bikini panty a better look two pieces of stretch tulle were cut for each. A clear water soluble stabilizer was used for machine sewing. The stockings were not doubled.
Since bandeaux bras have a habit of curling over on dolls with shapely bustlines, I used narrow satin ribbons to create straps.

Cheongsam, New York Style-Part Two: The Accessories

Kathrynne’s earrings were made using eye pins as the post. Champagne colored seed pearls were first threaded onto a thin gold tone wire. The wire was then shaped into tiny hoops and joined to the end of the eye pin.

The clutch purse pattern was created by measuring a similar pocket book made as part of a Repro Barbie ensemble. The pattern is all in one piece, a basic rectangle with a curved ending for the top of the purse. Gold obi brocade silk was used and lined with the same fabric as the dress. A tiny thread loop closes over a crystal bead.

The same gold toned wire used for the earring hoops was used for the bracelet. This time the champagne colored seed pearls were mixed with a very pale pink colored seed pearl for the bracelet. The beads are held in place by tightly coiled ends on each side of the wire. I also created a small loop on one end to attach a “charm” made of a few red beads threaded onto the wire and then pulled together before attaching to the end of the bracelet. The finished bracelet is then coiled around the dolls wrist.

Cheongsam, New York Style-Part One

Kathrynne models her sheath dress and accessories inspired by the Chinese Cheongsam. A sheath pattern with two vertical darts on each side of the front and back dress formed the basis for the New York Style Cheongsam. Cap sleeves that are in one with the dress were added to the pattern. Instead of a Mandarin collar a high band collar cut on the lengthwise grain was used. No underlining was needed because the 100% cotton fabric used had enough body. A Japanese furoshiki with a small floral pattern suitable to 1:6 scale sewing provided the perfect look and feel for the dress.

The sheath dress was tapered at the side seams about 1/16″ at the hemline level. A line connecting this new point was drawn up to another point about 1/4′ down from the hipline. Instead of the side slits used in a traditional Cheongsam, a kickpleat was created at Center Back.

The Center Back placket was cut in one piece with the dress by adding 1/2″ to the Center Back of the pattern. In this way, the kickpleat was a continuation of the placket. Edges of the placket were finished with bias cut green tulle nylon vielling fabric. The collar at Center Back closes with a very small button and thread loop.

In New York Style Cheongsam, Part Two I will present close-ups and details for how the accessories for this ensemble were created.

A scan of this pattern is available for your use at https://theenchanteddressshop.wordpress.com/2015/11/03/pattern-scan-for-cheongsam-new-york-style-dress/

Underlining, Cutting, Marking and Basting a 1:6 scale doll outfit

It is possible to underline a 1:6 scale doll outfit provided the material used is very lightweight. Depending on the effect desired I’ve used poly chiffon, poly China silk, lightweight muslin and nylon tulle with good results. Sometimes it is necessary to experiment on scraps of fabric to learn the technique and develop the sensibility for what will work well together. I did this with the dress design I call “Cheongsam, New York Style”. For the trial run I used long vertical stitches to hold together a layer of 100% cotton with poly china silk. The fabric was first trued and steam pressed and pinned in place before basting together.

The pattern pieces are laid out on the fabric and pinned into place. I find using fine straight pins with colored glass heads a good way to keep track of the slender pins. Marking seam allowances onto the pattern is the best way to go when working on such a small scale.

I’ve found using the Fiskars Micro-tip Scissors just right for cutting out 1:6 scale garment pieces. I prefer to use white dressmakers marking paper since the markings vanish after steam pressing. For all marking in 1:6 scale I use a smooth tracing wheel.

The garment pieces after cutting have key lines and darts thread traced in black. The darts and seams are then pinned into place and basted. I do not recommend pin basting, especially on such a small scale, even when hand sewing. Small, even hand sewn stitches are just not possible when sewing over pins.

The cut and basted garment pieces are kept together with the needles and thread used for hand sewing in a plastic baggie. It is a good idea to jot down any notes regarding notions or construction onto 3″ x 5″ file cards and include that in the baggie. This will help you remember what to do next if there will be an interruption or long break between hand sewing sessions.

Special Note: It turned out to be a good thing I made a toile for the Cheongsam, New York Style dress. The dart intake was too big and the fit on the doll was very unsatisfactory. After creating two smaller darts the dress looked very good when made up in the fashion fabric. I will present the Cheongsam, New York Style dress in my next posting.

Afternoon Appointment, Version 2

Molly is the dressmaker and designer at The Enchanted Dress Shop. She designs girly and frilly outfits her customers call confections. Molly’s personal style is much simpler. Like Julie she prefers classic, simple styles. This chemise was made from the same pattern that Julie’s dress was made from. Instead of the elastic which shaped Julie’s dress at the waistline, a slight curve was made on the pattern from underarm to hipline. At the hipline a 1/4″ ribbon was hand stitched into place. A small bow was stitched into place and then tacked to the side. Slightly transparent red glass seed beads were used for the pocket book and earrings to complete the look.

The dress is made of 100% cotton backed with white poly organza. The organza added a nice touch and keeps the chemise silhouette looking it’s best. The neckline and armholes were finished with bias strips of nylon tulle. At the back there is a placket finished in bias cut organza onto which snaps are sewn.

 

Afternoon Appointment Version 1

Julie is the fitting model for at The Enchanted Dress Shop. She is a very active and busy young woman. She prefers classic fashions and accessories. The dress shown here was created from a basic unfitted bodice with side dart. Elastic was added at the waistline. To keep the hemline neat, a bias strip of tulle was used to finish the edge of the hem. The hem was catch stitched to the organza underlining.

 

A hand beaded pocketbook was created using felt circles and a necklace chain. The colors of the beads pick-up the flowers of the 100% cotton fabric.

 

Julie’s earrings consist of eye pins containing small jump rings to which a tiny jade colored seed bead was added. The neckline and armholes were finished using bias strips of white tulle catch stitched into place. The dress was underlined in white sparkle organza. There isn’t any casing for the waistline elastic. Instead wide catch stitches were made over the elastic after one end was sewn into place. After that the elastic was pulled to create the gathers. The lace was steamed and shaped into a curve and allowed to dry. Then it was stitched along the neckline.

Underneath it all: Construction of the Garden Party Dress

Inside the Garden Party dress. The bodice was lined with poly china silk and sewn in using a slip stitch. The petticoate was gathered in one with the skirt. The sash connects bodice and skirt. The sash lining was then sewn in place. To minimize bulk, the upper part of the petticoat was made of poly organza.

The lower part of the petticoat is in two layers. The over layer is poly china silk. The under layer is tulle. A 3/4′ to 1″ hem was used for the petticoat and the skirt of the dress.

View of the under layer of the lower part of the petticoat. Two layers of nylon tulle were used. You can also see that a small strip of tulle was placed under the upper portion of the skirt. It was treated as one with the skirt so that it will provide a little lift around the gathers at the waist.

The lightweight layers of nylon tulle and poly china silk lend a gentle but significant support to the skirt and bodice of the dress.